Publisher’s Weekly Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2016: Fiction

Since it's September, can we officially talk about fall stuff yet?  Here's one of Publisher's Weekly's lists of good books coming out this season:

The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead (Doubleday, Aug.) - A young slave makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South, on a literal Underground Railroad, with engineers and conductors operating a secret network of tracks and tunnels beneath Southern soil.

Commonwealth by Ann Patchett (Harper, Sept.) - Patchett’s family portrait is a collage of parents, children, and stepchildren, showing how alliances and animosities ebb and flow over time, and how a fatal accident changes the family for good.

Swing Time by Zadie Smith (Penguin Press, Nov.) - Two girls dream of being dancers—but only one, Tracey, has talent. The other has ideas: about rhythm and time, about black bodies and black music, and about what constitutes a tribe and what makes a person truly free. The friendship ends abruptly, never to be revisited, but never quite forgotten.

Here I Am by Jonathan Safran Foer (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, Sept.) - Unfolding over four tumultuous weeks in present-day Washington, D.C., Foer’s first novel in 11 years is the story of a fracturing family in a moment of crisis.

The Mothers by Brit Bennett (Riverhead, Oct.) - This debut novel begins with 17-year-old Nadia Turner’s pregnancy (the father is the local pastor’s son), and the subsequent cover-up. Years later, living in debt, the characters are haunted by what might have happened if they had made different decisions.

http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/tip-sheet/article/71042-the-most-anticipated-books-of-fall-2016.html

The link above also includes PW’s anticipated lists for Fall 2016 in these categories:  mystery/thriller/crime, science fiction/fantasy/horror, romance/erotica, poetry, comics/graphic novels, memoir, literary essays/criticisms/biographies, history, politics, music, science, and religion.